Eamonn McCann On The Irish Church & State Collusion In Child Rape

An excerpt-

…There’s scarcely a bishop in the 26 Irish dioceses who hasn’t issued a statement in the past fortnight explaining how dismayed/distressed/shocked/bewildered he’s been to discover the extent of the depravity perpetrated by priests and the failure of some of his fellow bishops to alert the civil authorities. Some of the more plausible performers have been wheeled out to widen their eyes for the cameras in displays of wonderment….“I cannot begin to understand the mentality…” They still take the people for fools.

Complaints of clerical abuse of children in Ireland have been in the public arena for at least 25 years. Occasionally, flurries of allegations have resulted in spates of publicity. But these tended to be short-lived. The local bishop might even apologise in the local paper. The response of the Northern as well as the Southern Irish State ranged from the inadequate to the inert. But you could bet the Lenten Collection that the Church itself was paying attention throughout, tracking every complaint, monitoring reaction, clucking with satisfaction that the faith of the people remained strong and resistant to any radical conclusion.

Now they ask the people to believe that they didn’t have an inkling of the full extent of the criminality until very recently. They never discreetly enquired of one another during prayer breaks at their conclaves at Maynooth or All Hallows, How’s that business with Fr. So-and-so going? Any more word about that wee girl from such-and-such? Is the mother in that other case still on-side?

Pull the other one, your Lordships, it’s got church-bells on.

The Church’s enmeshment with the State helps explain this confidence. On December 1st, Taoiseach (Prime Minister) Brian Cowan claimed in parliament that the Vatican had “acted in good faith” in refusing to cooperate with Judge Murphy. The authorities in Rome and their representative in Ireland, the Papal Nuncio, had refused even to answer letters from Murphy asking for access to their files on abuse allegations.

A State which had genuine concern for its children would have responded to the report by taking decisive action to remove the Catholic bishops as patrons of primary schools. Three thousand of 3,200 primaries in the Republic have bishops as patrons – with the power to hire and fire and complete control over the school’s “ethos”. No less appropriate category of men could be imagined to have such power over the moral formation of children. But not a single member of parliament – not one! – has urged the Government to take this obvious action.

Control of education is at the heart of the matter. A ferocious determination to secure the right to train the consciousness of the next generation dictated the Catholic hierarchy’s attitude to the emerging Irish State in the early years of the last century. Give us your children and we’ll give you our backing against the British and help shore up your State. The State was born in the embrace of the Church and hasn’t fully recovered from its origins

In the North, the Church did its dirty deal with the anti-Catholic Unionists. Control of the education of the children of Catholic parents in return for a commitment to keep the Catholics as docile as possible. The arrangement lasted at least into the 1980s, when the Northern bishops told the British government that if it proceeded with a plan to integrate teacher training the Church would be unable to restrain the anger of the faithful. That is, Lay a finger on our control of teacher training and we’ll stop condemning the IRA from the pulpit. And it worked.

Not that the IRA – now transmogrified into Sinn Fein – has proven any more useful that the other useless parties to the raped children of Ireland.

Consider a case from the North: A priest is transferred from the South into a Derry parish. The night before he arrives, the priests in the parochial house are visited by an emissary from the bishop who tells them to “keep an eye” on their new colleague, and specifically to ensure that he is not left alone with children. Over the next few months, despite two curates taking turns to follow him around, he rapes two little girls. The family of one of the girls informs the bishop. He ignores them. They then write to the Cardinal, the most senior Churchman on the island, describing the assault on their daughter in heart-rending terms and the shattering effect both on her and the family. The Cardinal acknowledges the letter, expresses sympathy – and assures the family that he will remember them in his prayers. The rapist is moved out of the parish and hidden in a monastery in the South. When he is traced there and exposed, the bishop lies in public that the Church had earlier informed the civil authorities of the allegations. The priest is eventually jailed.

The bishop concerned has been among those seen on television in the past fortnight explaining that the situation in his diocese regarding the handling of allegations of child sex abuse has always been tickedy-boo.

Bastards.

And then some. I was listening to an Irish radio call in show (we receive some here on the edge of the Irish sea) while waiting to drive my mother back from a hospital appointment and 99% of the calls, emails, texts were disgusted at the church, but what was interesting was the DJ tried to moderate the rage and people were calling for resignations, few made the conceptual leap to demand prosecutions (and given the state collusion this might mean an international court as the domestic legal system is less than open). Most callers were middle aged and older, I think the church is dreading when they have to rely for support on a younger generation, that bigoted old vampires at the top are probably hiding away the money even now. One caller had an idea for direct action for parishioners, simply stop putting money in the collection until the church’s conservative pro-abuse ruling faction is removed, all the way to Rome. So it was interesting that although they were rightly outraged the limits of the reaction were not too radical (was that how the show screened?), although what is radical about demanding a paedophile rapist and the people who covered up for him be tried I don’t know. Unless we define radical as demanding the same standards be applied to the powerful as to the powerless, it’s clever when we are convinced of that definition by the elite, works out just great for them.

3 Responses to “Eamonn McCann On The Irish Church & State Collusion In Child Rape”

  1. earwicga Says:

    There wasn’t a bishop in Ireland who didn’t collude with their paedophile priests crimes. They should all be prosecuted. Liars!

    I recently read Andrew Madden’s Altar Boy and would urge everyone to read it to see quite how the bishops encouraged the abuse of children.

    Have you seen Colm O’Gorman’s site? http://colmogorman.com/

  2. RickB Says:

    No, thanks for the link. It’ amazing, no one believes them, they should be in court yet it’s about power, I hope people start to take that power away, take it back from the abusing establishment.


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